Even when you enroll in Medicare, your out-of-pocket costs, including deductibles, co-insurance and co-pays can be significant. This is especially true in Minnesota where health insurance premiums vary based on location and population density. It is important to consider options that can help reduce your out-of-pocket costs. Medicare supplements (also known as Medigap), Medicare managed-care style health plans (Advantage and Cost plans) and Part D plans can provide you the coverage and protection you may need. These additional plans must be approved by the Minnesota Department of Insurance, so you can rest assured that all plans meet the established criteria.
The Minnesota Board on Aging (MBA) may be helpful for seniors seeking a wide range of information. The office provides education in a broad range of areas, including health-care coverage and Medicare plans. The office was first established in 1956. Since that time, seniors have been able to turn to the Minnesota Board of Aging for a variety of programs, including:
Medicare Advantage plans continue to see changes. While healthcare reform is slowly reducing rebates paid to Medicare Advantage plans, these plans continue to be popular. 33 percent of Medicare recipients were enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan in 2017—a significant increase from the enrollment total in 2010 when the ACA was signed into law. Most people continue to have numerous Medicare Advantage plans as well as Part D plans available to them. However, these providers can change the coverage options they offer from year to year so it’s important to stay up-to-date.
Medicare is a federal health insurance program that pays for a variety of health care expenses. It’s administered by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), a division of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Medicare beneficiaries are typically senior citizens who are 65 years of age and older. Adults with certain approved medical conditions (such as Lou Gehrig’s Disease) or qualifying permanent disabilities may also be eligible for Medicare benefits.
Unfortunately, this does not guarantee that you can return to the Medigap plan you had before. Unless this was your first time ever in a Medicare Advantage plan, then you will usually have to answer health questions and go through medical underwriting to get re-approved for Medigap. Consider this before dropping any Medigap plan to go to Medicare Advantage.
Medicare beneficiaries in Minnesota have the option to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan as an alternative way to get their Original Medicare, Part A and Part B, coverage. Also known as Medicare Part C, Medicare Advantage plans are available through private insurance companies that contract with Medicare. All Medicare Advantage plans are required to provide at least the same level of coverage as Original Medicare, meaning you’ll get the same hospital and medical benefits of Part A and Part B through your Medicare Advantage plan. In addition, some Medicare Advantage plans may also offer additional benefits, such as routine dental, vision, hearing, or prescription drugs.

The Minnesota Board on Aging (MBA) may be helpful for seniors seeking a wide range of information. The office provides education in a broad range of areas, including health-care coverage and Medicare plans. The office was first established in 1956. Since that time, seniors have been able to turn to the Minnesota Board of Aging for a variety of programs, including:
While Original Medicare rarely changes, many insurance watchers expect Medicare Advantage plans for 2019 to vary quite a bit from the previous years. Medicare Advantage plans, sometimes called Medicare Part C, can offer a beneficiary an alternate way to receive their health-care benefits after being enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B. Rather than having coverage delivered by the government, a Medicare Advantage plan has payments made by a private insurance company.
When first looking at Minnesota Medicare costs, you must first have Medicare premiums explained. Medicare plans have multiple payment types, premiums, co-pay and deductibles. MN Medicare premiums are usually referred to the most when paying for Medicare, but this is just because they are typically the first payment listed on a plan. A premium is simply how much a beneficiary has to pay every single month to get Minnesota Medicare insurance coverage. The premium has to be paid whether or not the beneficiary used any Medicare services. For Medicare Part A and B, the premium is usually around $100 to $150. Medicare Parts C and D come from private insurance companies, so the prices are based entirely on what they set.
If you’re automatically enrolled in Medicare Part B, but do not wish to keep it you have a few options to drop the coverage. If your Medicare coverage hasn’t started yet and you were sent a red, white, and blue Medicare card, you can follow the instructions that come with your card and send the card back. If you keep the Medicare card, you keep Part B and will need to pay Part B premiums. If you signed up for Medicare through Social Security, then you will need to contact them to drop Part B coverage. If your Medicare coverage has started and you want to drop Part B, contact Social Security for instructions on how to submit a signed request. Your coverage will end the first day of the month after Social Security gets your request.
In the 1970s, less than a decade after the beginning of fee for service Medicare, Medicare beneficiaries gained the option to receive their Medicare benefits through managed, capitated health plans, mainly HMOs, as an alternative to FFS Original Medicare, but only under random Medicare demonstration programs. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 formalized the demonstration programs into Medicare Part C, introduced the term Medicare+Choice as a pseudo-brand for this option. Initially, fewer insurers participated than expected, leading to little competition.[2] In a 2003 law, the capitated-fee benchmark/bidding process was changed effective in 2005 to increase insurer participation, but also increasing the costs per person of the program.

Humana - Humana is a Medicare Advantage (HMO, PPO and PFFS) organization and a stand-alone prescription drug plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in any Humana plan depends on contract renewal. • For Dual Eligible SNPs, Humana is a Coordinated Care plan with a Medicare contract and a contract with the state's Medicaid program. Enrollment in this Humana plan depends on contract renewal. • For other SNPs, Humana is a Coordinated Care plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in this Humana plan depends on contract renewal. • Sponsored by [legal entity] and the State of Florida, Agency For Health Care Administration. • "NOTICE: TennCare is not responsible for payment for these benefits, except for appropriate cost sharing amounts. TennCare is not responsible for guaranteeing the availability or quality of these benefits. Any reference to more, extra, or additional Medicare benefits, is applicable to Medicare only and does not indicate increased Medicaid benefits." • Humana MyOption optional supplemental benefits (OSB) are only available to members of certain Humana Medicare Advantage (MA) plans. Members of Humana plans that offer OSBs may enroll in OSBs throughout the year. Benefits may change on January 1st each year. • Enrollees must continue to pay the Medicare Part B premium, their Humana plan premium, and the OSB premium. • This information is not a complete description of benefits. Call [insert agency’s customer service phone number/TTY] for more information. • Other Pharmacies, Physicians, Providers are available in the Humana network.
Plans are insured through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or one of its affiliated companies, a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in the plan depends on the plan’s contract renewal with Medicare. UnitedHealthcare The Villages MedicareComplete is insured through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or one of its affiliated companies (UnitedHealthcare), a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in the plan depends on the plan's contract renewal with Medicare. Plans are insured through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or one of its affiliated companies, a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract and a contract with the State Medicaid Program. Enrollment in the plan depends on the plan's contract renewal with Medicare.
If you are eligible for automatic enrollment, you should not have to contact anyone. You should receive a package in the mail three months before your coverage starts with your new Medicare card. There will also be a letter explaining how Medicare works and that you were automatically enrolled in both Parts A and B. If you get Social Security retirement benefits, your package and card will come from the Social Security Administration (SSA). If you get Railroad Retirement benefits, your package and card will come from the Railroad Retirement Board.
The other parts of Medicare, however, do involve premiums that you have to pay in order to keep the coverage in force. That includes Medicare Part B (outpatient coverage) and Part D (prescription coverage), as well as supplemental Medigap plans. [ Medicare Part C, otherwise known as Medicare Advantage, wraps all of the coverage into one plan, and includes premiums for Part B as well as the Medicare Advantage plan itself.]

If you choose to go back to Original Medicare, you also have until March 31, 2019 to enroll in a Part D plan if you leave a Medicare Advantage plan with drug coverage, or if you switch from a Medicare Advantage plan with drug coverage and don't have prescription coverage with your new Medicare Advantage plan. You may have to pay a late enrollment penalty if you don’t enroll in a Part D plan at this time and decide to get it later.

The Minnesota Basic Plan includes supplemental coverage for expenses not covered by Medicare part A such as coinsurance, hospice and respite copays and in-home healthcare services. Other needs covered by the Minnesota Basic Plan include 100 days at a skilled nursing facility, full coverage for expenses related to Medicare-covered preventative care, 20% coverage for physical therapy and the receipt of 3 pints of blood annually.

Medicare Advantage plans are required to offer a benefit "package" that is at least equal to Original Medicare's and cover everything Medicare covers, but they may cover benefits in a different way. For example, plans that require higher out-of-pocket costs than Original Medicare for some benefits, such as skilled nursing facility care, might offer lower copayments for doctor visits to balance their benefits package.[11] CMS limits the extent to which plans' cost-sharing can vary from that of Original Medicare. Medicare Advantage plans that receive "rebates" or quality-based bonus payments are required to use the money to provide benefits not covered by Original Medicare.


If you're not getting Social Security payments already, you have to enroll in Medicare. The Social Security Administration (SSA) handles the enrollment process for Medicare. Call SSA at (800) 772-1213, visit the web site (www.ssa.gov), or apply at your local Social Security office. You have a 7-month enrollment period, beginning 3 months before your 65th birthday, your birthday month, and 3 months after your birthday. Apply early in your enrollment period to be sure that your benefits will start on time.

One of the Medicare Savings Programs (MSPs) is for Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMB). The QMB program covers the premiums for Medicare Part A and Part B. The deductibles, copays, and coinsurance costs are covered as well. An individual can qualify for this program with an income of no more than $1,032 a month. A married couple can also qualify with a combined income of less than $1,392 a month.
While you can save money with Medicare Advantage when you are healthy, if you get sick in the middle of the year, you are stuck with whatever costs you incur until you can switch plans during the next open season for Medicare. At that time you can switch to traditional Medicare with a Medigap, but Medigap can then charge you a higher rate than if you had initially enrolled in a Medigap policy when you first qualified for Medicare.
Special Election Period: Generally, once you enroll into a Medicare Advantage plan, you stay enrolled in the plan until the next Annual Election Period (AEP) opens. However, there are some life events that might qualify you for a Special Election Period (SEP) during other times of the year, so you can make a change to your Medicare Advantage coverage. Some examples of these life events include (but aren’t limited to):
Other enrollment periods. If you did not enroll in Parts A and B during the initial enrollment period, you may do so between Jan. 1 and March 31, with coverage beginning on July 1 that year. You may have to pay a higher monthly premium for coverage. There are some exceptions. If you are covered under a group health insurance plan through your job or your spouse's job, or if youremployment ends after the initial enrollment period, you may enroll in Medicare during a Special Enrollment Period without having to pay a late-enrollment penalty.
Starting in April 2018, Medicare beneficiaries began receiving new Medicare ID cards that don’t have Social Security numbers on them. This change was announced in September 2017, and it’s an effort to combat identity theft and fraud. The new cards, which are being mailed out over the course of a year (all beneficiaries will have them by April 2019, as required by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act—MACRA—of 2015), have randomly generated ID numbers instead of Social Security numbers. You can continue to use your current card until your new one arrives. Once it does, you’ll want to destroy and securely dispose of your old one, and begin using the new one instead.
Adams, Barnes, Benson, Billings, Bowman, Burleigh, Cass, Cavalier, Dickey, Dunn, Eddy, Emmons, Foster, Grand Forks, Grant, Griggs, Hettinger, Kidder, LaMoure, Logan, McHenry, McIntosh, McLean, Mercer, Morton, Nelson, Oliver, Pembina, Pierce, Ramsey, Ransom, Richland, Rolette, Sargent, Sheridan, Sioux, Slope, Stark, Steele, Stutsman, Towner, Traill, Walsh, Ward, Wells and Williams counties.
If you delay enrollment in Part B and don't have coverage from a current employer (or your spouse's current employer), you'll be subject to a late penalty when you eventually enroll in Part B. For each 12-month period that you were eligible for Part B but not enrolled, the penalty is an extra 10 percent added to the Part B premiums. And you'll pay this penalty for as long as you have Part B—which generally means for the rest of your life.

The Medicare program also gives you a window of opportunity to change your mind. Let’s say you are not happy with a Medicare Advantage plan you chose during the AEP. Between January 1 and February 14, you may drop that plan and switch to Original Medicare without penalty. You will return return to Original Medicare. If you need Part D coverage after you switch, you can also purchase a plan during the Medicare Advantage Disenrollment Period (ADP).


Unlike Original Medicare, if you want prescription drug benefits (Medicare Part D), you shouldn’t enroll in a separate Medicare Prescription Drug Plan. Instead, you can get this benefit through a Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plan. Not every Medicare Advantage plan includes prescription drug coverage, so always double-check with the specific plan you’re considering.
Medicare beneficiaries may also enroll in MedicareBlue℠ Rx (PDP), Platinum Blue℠ (Cost) & Blue Cross Medicare Advantage through the CMS Medicare Online Enrollment Center located at http://www.medicare.gov. If your employer offers Medicare coverage or you can get coverage under the Federal Employee Program® (FEP), please see your employer to learn about your coverage options. Medicare evaluates plans based on a 5-star rating system. Star Ratings are calculated each year and may change from one year to the next. You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. This information is not a complete description of benefits. Contact the plan for more information. Limitations, co-payments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, premiums and/or co-payments/co-insurance may change on January 1 of each year. For more information contact the plan. The formulary, pharmacy network, and/or provider network may change at any time. You will receive notice when necessary. Call 1 (855) 579-7658 (TTY 711) 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., daily.

AThe Plan Finder tool at Medicare.gov is the best way to compare all of the Medicare Advantage plans in your area. These plans provide medical and drug coverage from a private insurer, and are an alternative to signing up for traditional Medicare along with a medigap and a Part D prescription-drug policy. (You still have to pay the Medicare Part B premiums, and you'll usually have a monthly premium for the Medicare Advantage plan, too.)


If you choose an HMO, you need to get almost all of your covered health services from in-network providers. You also need a primary care doctor, or PCP, to give you referrals to specialists and certain other medical care. This means that you need to be sure that your favorite doctor and hospital are associated with the network. A PPO may charge higher rates, but it will cover out-of-network services. You still will save money with a PPO if you find in-network doctors and other medical providers.
Medicare prescription drug coverage — called Medicare Part D — was the result of legislation passed in 2003 and signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2006. It is a bit of a controversial program because it was an unfunded liability — meaning that the vast majority of costs fell on taxpayers — and the law also barred Medicare from negotiating lower drug prices with drug makers. But by the end of its first decade, Medicare Part D was providing coverage for almost three quarters of all eligible Medicare beneficiaries, including those who have Part D coverage as part of their Medicare Advantage plan).
Medicare Advantage, also known as Medicare Part C, is another way to receive Original Medicare benefits and is offered through private insurance companies. At minimum, all Medicare Advantage plans must offer the same Medicare Part A and Part B benefits as Original Medicare. Some Medicare Advantage plans also include additional benefits, such as prescription drug coverage. You must have Original Medicare, Part A and B, to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan through a private insurer.
You'd only be subject to a Part A late enrollment penalty if you're not eligible for premium-free Part A coverage. Most Americans don't have to worry about this, as they have at least ten years of work history, or are/were married to someone who does. But if you'd have to pay a premium to buy Part A coverage, there's a penalty if you delay your enrollment.
CMS and MedPAC now believe the "like beneficiary" calculations (those on A/B vs those on A/B/C) that have been used for a decade and that underlay many changes made by PPACA and subsequent regulations are not comparative and are misleading (see slide 8 of the January 12, 2017 MedPAC session on Medicare Advantage and other discussions on this subject since that time). That is because the calculations include the increasing number of people only on Part A (primarily because they did not "retire" at 65 given the higher Social Security full retirement age but did join Medicare Part A at 65 as recommended) whereas a "like" Medicare Part C beneficiary has to be on both Parts A and Part B. On an absolute basis, in 2015 Medicare spent 4% less on Medicare Advantage and other Part C beneficiaries per person than they did per person on Medicare beneficiaries under FFS Medicare.[9] In 2014 the difference in parity on an absolute basis was 2% less per person on Part C.[10] It appears from both points of view—per "like beneficiary" and absolutely—that the latest formula delivers the original cost-saving promise of Managed Medicare. But an absolute comparison is not totally accurate either.

Minnesota Benefit Association, through our insurance administrators,  has helped thousands of Minnesotans make the right Medicare choices. We offer unbiased advice, and have no special allegiance to one insurance company over another. The goal is to get each individual matched with the insurance company and the Medicare plan that is best suited for them.


People often ask us our opinion on which plan is the best Medicare Advantage plan. This varies based on a number of personal factors. What’s right for your friend or neighbor may not be right for you. Don’t risk making a mistake on something as critical as your health insurance. Get help from an experienced agent who can explain your options in detail.
ACA provided bonus payments to plans with ratings of 4 (out of 5) stars or more. The Obama administration launched an $8.35 billion demonstration project in 2012 that increased the size of the bonus payments and increased the number of plans receiving bonus payments, providing bonus payments to the majority of Medicare Advantage plans.[6] According to the Government Accountability Office (GAO) this demonstration project cost more than the previous 85 demonstration projects beginning in 1995 combined.[7]
Either you enroll in Medicare Part A, or you forfeit your Social Security benefits. Most individuals are unwilling to forfeit their Social Security benefits, and thus accept the enrollment into Medicare. Note that you're only required to accept Medicare Part A—which is premium-free if you're receiving Social Security benefits—in order to retain your Social Security benefits. You are allowed to reject Medicare Part B—which has a premium—if you choose to do so, although you could be subject to a late enrollment penalty if you choose to enroll in Part B at a later date.

There’s a new premium bracket for the highest-income Part B and Part D enrollees. Under the terms of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, enrollees with income of $500,000 or more ($750,000 or more for a married couple) will pay a new, higher premium for Part B and Part D coverage in 2019 and future years. For reference, in 2018, the highest income bracket starts at $160,000 ($320,000 for a married couple). The Medicare Trustees’ report projected a Part B premium of $460.70/month for Part B enrollees in the new highest bracket in 2019, and an additional $82.90/month added to the Part D premiums charged by the insurer that provides the Part D coverage.
If you sign up for Part B, you will pay a deductible each year before Medicare starts to pick up health care costs for Part B services. The Part B deductible for 2019 is $185. Beneficiaries may be able to get help from their state to pay this premium and deductible. If you have Part A and Part B and are not enrolled in a private plan (see below) you are in what is called Original Medicare.
You’ll have the opportunity to disenroll from your Medicare Advantage plan and return to Original Medicare during the Medicare Advantage Disenrollment Period, which runs from January 1 to February 14. You cannot use this period to switch Medicare Advantage plans or make other changes. However, if you decide to drop your Medicare Advantage plan, you can also use this period to join a stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan, since Original Medicare doesn’t include prescription drug coverage.
You should pay special attention to the Medicare Open Enrollment Period (OEP), which is also called the Medicare Annual Election Period (AEP). Medicare recipients can enroll in, make changes to or disenroll from a Medicare Advantage plan (Medicare Part C) or a Medicare Prescription Drug plan (Medicare Part D) during this period, which runs from October 15 to December 7 every year. Plan elections made during the 2018 Medicare Open Enrollment Period go into effect January 2019.
If you are under 65 and receiving certain disability benefits from Social Security or the Railroad Retirement Board, you will be automatically enrolled in Original Medicare, Part A and Part B, after 24 months of disability benefits. The exception to this is if you have end-stage renal disease (ESRD). If you have ESRD and had a kidney transplant or need regular kidney dialysis, you can apply for Medicare. If you have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease), you will automatically be enrolled in Original Medicare in the same month that your disability benefits start.
When first looking at Minnesota Medicare costs, you must first have Medicare premiums explained. Medicare plans have multiple payment types, premiums, co-pay and deductibles. MN Medicare premiums are usually referred to the most when paying for Medicare, but this is just because they are typically the first payment listed on a plan. A premium is simply how much a beneficiary has to pay every single month to get Minnesota Medicare insurance coverage. The premium has to be paid whether or not the beneficiary used any Medicare services. For Medicare Part A and B, the premium is usually around $100 to $150. Medicare Parts C and D come from private insurance companies, so the prices are based entirely on what they set.
If you have individual market coverage, purchased in the exchange or outside the exchange, you'll need to contact the exchange or your insurer to ask them to cancel your coverage when you transition to Medicare. Prior to the ACA, individual market insurers typically wouldn't insure anyone over the age of 64, so plans were automatically terminated when people turned 65. That is no longer the case, so enrollees need to make sure that they actively cancel their individual market coverage when they switch to Medicare.

For some services, you pay a deductible, copayment, or co-insurance before Medicare begins to help pay for that service. For Medicare Part B or Part D, or for Medicare Advantage or Medicare Cost plans, you may have to pay a monthly premium, unless you qualify to get help paying for your Medicare premiums, copayments, and deductibles through MA, a Medicare Savings Program (MSP), or the Low Income Subsidy (LIS).
There’s a new premium bracket for the highest-income Part B and Part D enrollees. Under the terms of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, enrollees with income of $500,000 or more ($750,000 or more for a married couple) will pay a new, higher premium for Part B and Part D coverage in 2019 and future years. For reference, in 2018, the highest income bracket starts at $160,000 ($320,000 for a married couple). The Medicare Trustees’ report projected a Part B premium of $460.70/month for Part B enrollees in the new highest bracket in 2019, and an additional $82.90/month added to the Part D premiums charged by the insurer that provides the Part D coverage.

Medicare Advantage plans continue to see changes. While healthcare reform is slowly reducing rebates paid to Medicare Advantage plans, these plans continue to be popular. 33 percent of Medicare recipients were enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan in 2017—a significant increase from the enrollment total in 2010 when the ACA was signed into law. Most people continue to have numerous Medicare Advantage plans as well as Part D plans available to them. However, these providers can change the coverage options they offer from year to year so it’s important to stay up-to-date.
By entering my contact information and clicking "Compare plans now" I consent to receive e-mails, telephone calls, text messages and artificial or pre-recorded messages from TZ Insurance Solutions LLC licensed insurance agents or its affiliates and third-party partners (or their service provider partners on their behalf), regarding health insurance products and services including Medicare Advantage and Prescription Drug Plans, at the e-mail address and telephone number provided above, including my wireless number (if provided), using an automated telephone dialing system. I recognize that I am not required to grant this consent in order to receive information on, or enroll in, a Medicare plan or a private health insurance plan through the foregoing companies. I may call 1-800-557-6059 to opt out of receiving such contacts. I also agree to this website's Privacy Policy and Terms & Conditions. To compare plans with a licensed insurance agent in your area please fill out the form above or call 1-800-557-6059.
If you're not getting Social Security payments already, you have to enroll in Medicare. The Social Security Administration (SSA) handles the enrollment process for Medicare. Call SSA at (800) 772-1213, visit the web site (www.ssa.gov), or apply at your local Social Security office. You have a 7-month enrollment period, beginning 3 months before your 65th birthday, your birthday month, and 3 months after your birthday. Apply early in your enrollment period to be sure that your benefits will start on time.
If you’re ready to start browsing plan options, eHealth’s Medicare plan comparison tool may be useful. You can find Medicare plan options based on location, insurance company, premium cost, and more. Our plan finder tool is a convenient way for you to compare plan details side-by-side to ensure that the most important aspects of your health-care needs are covered.
If you decide to leave a Medicare Advantage plan and return back to Original Medicare, you must notify your Medicare Advantage plan carrier. Otherwise Medicare will continue to show that you are enrolled in the Advantage plan instead of Medicare. This is a common billing nightmare that we see among people who enrolled on their own without the help of an agent.
UCare for Seniors is an HMO-POS plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in UCare for Seniors depends on contract renewal. UCare Minnesota is an HMO-POS plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in UCare Minnesota depends on contract renewal. EssentiaCare is a PPO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in EssentiaCare depends on contract renewal. UCare Health, Inc. is an HMO-POS plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in UCare Health depends on contract renewal. Out-of-network/non-contracted providers are under no obligation to treat UCare for Seniors, UCare Medicare, EssentiaCare and UCare Medicare with Fairview & North Memorial Health members, except in emergency situations. Please call our customer service number or see your Evidence of Coverage for more information, including the cost-sharing that applies to out-of-network services. Medicare beneficiaries may also enroll in UCare for Seniors, UCare Medicare, EssentiaCare and UCare Medicare with Fairview & North Memorial Health through the CMS Medicare Online Enrollment Center located at http://www.medicare.gov/ (external site). You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. This information is not a complete description of benefits. Please call UCare for Seniors, UCare Medicare, or UCare Medicare with Fairview & North Memorial Health at 1-877-523-1518, or EssentiaCare at 1-855-432-7027 toll free, TTY users should call 1-800-688-2534 toll free for more information. This information is available in alternate formats or languages. Please call UCare for Seniors, UCare Medicare, or UCare Medicare with Fairview & North Memorial Health at 1-877-523-1518, or EssentiaCare at 1-855-432-7027 toll free, TTY users should call 1-800-688-2534 toll free to request this information in other formats or languages. UCare complies with applicable Federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability or sex. UCare does not exclude people or treat them differently because of race, color, national origin, age, disability or sex. We provide aids and services at no charge to people with disabilities to communicate effectively with us, such as TTY line, or written information in other formats, such as large print. If you need these services, contact us at 612-676-6500 (voice) or toll free at 1-866-457-7144 (voice); 612‑676‑6810 (TTY) or toll free at 1-800-688-2534 (TTY). We provide language services at no charge to people whose primary language is not English, such as qualified interpreters or information written in other languages. If you need these services, contact us at the number on the back of your membership card or 612‑676‑6500 (voice) or toll free at 1-866-457-7144 (voice); 612-676-6810 (TTY) or toll free at 1‑800‑688‑2534 (TTY). If you believe that UCare has failed to provide these services or discriminated in another way on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability or sex, you can file an oral or written grievance. Oral grievance If you are a current UCare member, please call the number on the back of your membership card. Otherwise please call 612-676-6500 (voice) or toll free at 1-866-457-7144 (voice); 612-676-6810 (TTY) or toll free at 1‑800-688-2534 (TTY). You can also use these numbers if you need assistance filing a grievance. Written grievance Mailing Address UCare Attn: Appeals and Grievances PO Box 52 Minneapolis, MN 55440-0052 Email: cag@ucare.org Fax: 612-884-2021 You can also file a civil rights complaint with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights, electronically through the Office for Civil Rights Complaint Portal, available at https://ocrportal.hhs.gov/ocr/portal/lobby.jsf, or by mail or phone at: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 200 Independence Avenue SW Room 509F, HHH Building Washington, D.C. 20201 1-800-368-1019, 1-800-537-7697 (TDD) Complaint forms are available at http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/office/file/index.html
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