Medicare Advantage Disenrollment Period: If, after enrolling in a Medicare Advantage plan, you change your mind, you can switch back to Original Medicare from January 1 through February 14 each year. If you would be losing prescription coverage as a result of the switch, you can also enroll into a stand-alone Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plan during this time, if you wish.
So if you delay your enrollment, you could be paying higher premiums when you eventually do enroll, and you'll have to wait until an open enrollment period in order to have access to coverage. If you're only enrolled in Part A, for example, and you get diagnosed with a serious illness in April, you'll have to wait until the following January to have Part D coverage, and until the following July—more than a year in the future—to have Part B coverage. 
DECODING MEDICARE health insurance plan options can be daunting for Medicare beneficiaries. People usually qualify for Medicare at age 65 and may be automatically signed up if they're receiving Social Security payments, unless they take steps to opt out. Original Medicare comes in two parts: Part A and Part B. Part A covers a portion of hospitalization expenses, and Part B applies to doctor bills and other medical expenses, such as lab tests and some preventive screenings.

Now that you have an idea of the type of Medicare plan options for Minnesotans, would you like some assistance looking for a plan that fits? I’d be happy to help, and you can click on the “View profile” link below to view my profile if you’d like. How about setting up a phone call with me, or having me send you some information by email? You can click on the links below to do that. Some folks prefer to research plans on their own; you can do that easily by clicking on the Compare Plans option on the right.
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